8.2 Million Italians

In Italy there are over 5000 homeopathic physicians, 7000 pharmacies dispensing homeopathic medicines and 20 different laboratories. In a study in the early part of the last decade, 8.2 million Italians reported using homeopathy and approximately 90% of them said they were helped by the treatment.

Harvard Study Has Good News for Homeopathic Medicine By John Weeks March 4, 2016

Harvard Study Has Good News for Homeopathic Medicine

John Weeks

March 4, 2016

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by John Weeks, Publisher/Editor of The Integrator Blog News and Reports

The American Journal of Public Health has recently published a survey article out of Harvard that shows that homeopathic medicine, while still only used by a small fraction of the U.S. population, has jumped 15% in use. In addition, most users put homeopathy among the top 3 complementary and integrative strategies they use in their health care.

The interest of this journal in this publication is linked to possible public health benefits from the use of homeopathic medicine. The principal investigator was Michelle Dossett, MD, PhD and the team also included placebo expert Ted Kaptchuk, OMD. They hail from Harvard’s School of Public Health and from a Harvard Medical School affiliated hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess. The teams notes that prior studies of homeopathy “suggest potential public health benefits such as reductions in unnecessary antibiotic usage, reductions in costs to treat certain respiratory diseases, improvements in peri-menopausal depression, improved health outcomes in chronically ill individuals, and control of a Leptospirosis epidemic in Cuba.”

The data was gleaned from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey. The researchers explored the prevalence and use patterns of homeopathic medicines among U.S. adults in relation to other complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) use. Versions of this survey in 2002 and 2007 found use of homeopathic medicines at 1.7% and 1.8% of the adult population, respectively. The 15% growth in the recent half-decade corresponds to an overall use rate of 2.1% in 2012. The most common conditions for which people sought homeopathic treatment were respiratory and ear-nose-and-throat complaints as well as musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Users tended to be more educated than non-users.

Use of homeopathy in the US is lower than in many European countries. The authors note, for instance, that surveys have found rates at 8.2% in Italy and nearly 15% in Germany. A recent Italian wire-service story reported findings of a 2012 survey by a homeopathic manufacturer that found much higher use, at close to one-in-six adult Italians.

The Harvard team reported that positive views of homeopathy were much higher among those who saw a professional homeopath compared to those who simply purchased the pills from the store and self-prescribed. Those who consulted professionals were more likely to feel that homeopathy was “very important in maintaining health and well-being.” The sense of the importance of the remedies was also stronger. More of those who’d consulted a homeopathic practitioner thought that homeopathy helped their health condition “a great deal” than did the self-prescribers.

Naysayers, who believe these medicine are nothing more than placebos, will likely question the additional perceived value post practitioner visit. Is it anything more than the greater level of investment in a placebo one has if the placebo is practitioner-recommended rather than self-prescribed?

The article came to The Integrator from homeopath and author Dana Ullman, MPH, CCH (pictured). He sent notice of the Harvard publication and of the recent report on Italian use with this note: “Here's some GOOD news about homeopathy!”

Ullman adds: "This survey confirms that a certain well-educated and well-satisfied group of Americans benefit from self-prescribing homeopathic medicines as well as from going to professional homeopaths. Although these numbers are much higher in select countries in Europe, it is more than reasonable to support individual choice in health care. Just as our country is a melting pot of different cultures and races, our health and medical care likewise needs this healthy diversity."

Homeopathy has taken it on the chin the last two years. The Harvard study was published amidst a renewed flare up of bad publicity following a controversial 2015 report from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. The chair of the report, general practitioner Paul Glasziou, MD blogged on the controversial findings at the British Medical Journal. A wave of postings from anti-homeopathy writers, such as this, immediately followed.

Weighing the public health potential of homeopathic medicine requires a wading into a river of twin ambiguities. These can each be true simultaneously: 1) homeopathic treatment only has value as a placebo, and 2) expanded use of these medicines can be useful tools in the public health campaign against antibiotic overuse. This 2008 study, for instance, found that 13% of doctors use antibiotics as placebos. Mightn’t we have been better off, from a population health perspective, had they prescribed homeopathic remedies and not delivered this extra load of antibiotics onto the terrain?

French researchers spoke to this potential last year when they concluded that “management of patients by homeopathic GPs may be less expensive from a global perspective and may represent an important interest to public health.” The Harvard researchers included a similar note: “Because of potential public health benefits associated with the use of homeopathy, further research on this modality and targeted studies of users are warranted.”

Perhaps the way to move forward is to allow skeptical doctors to deliver homeopathic medicine to their patients while announcing to them that it is a placebo. Kaptchuk and others have reported that the placebos can still work. If they have more significant positive value, well, that healing can take place without the skeptic’s approval.

About the Author:

John Weeks

John Weeks is a writer, speaker, chronicler and organizer with 32 years of experience in the movement for integrative health and medicine. the long-time founder/editor of The Integrator Blog News & Reports, a primary connective terrain for the diverse stakeholders and professions in the field and was invited in May 2016 to serve as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. Besides his Integrative Practitioner column, he presently writes for Integrative Medicine: A Clinician’s Journal, the Huffington Post and elsewhere.

He increasingly enjoys teaching and mentoring. He has keynoted, led plenary sessions, breakouts, and offered guest lectures for dozens of organizations ranging from the Bastyr University to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the UCLA School of Medicine to the Institute for Health and Productivity Management, the AANP and AIHM to the American Hospital Association. He has consulted with insurers, employers, professional organizations, universities and government agencies at all levels.

As an organizer, Weeks convened the Integrative Medicine Industry Leadership Summits (2000-2002), directed the National Education Dialogue to Advance Integrated Care (2004-2006), fund-raised the start-up of the Integrated Healthcare Policy Consortium (2002), and co-founded the Academic Collaborative for Integrative Health, which he directed 2007-2015. In 2014, three consortia and others combined to grant him a Lifetime Achievement Living Tribute Award. Four academic institutions have granted Weeks honorary doctorates for his work. Seattle-based, he considers himself a particularly lucky soul to have worked remotely while living with his spouse Jeana Kimball, ND, MPH, and their children in Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Puerto Rico for 6 of the last 15 years.

https://www.integrativepractitioner.com/topics/news/harvard-study-has-good-news-for-homeopathic-medicine

Role of homeopathy in the treatment of depression.

Role of homeopathy in the treatment of depression.

Role of homeopathy in the treatment of depression.

Read More

Myths vs. Mythology;

“Homeopathy is not science”

http://snip.ly/lz322

There are critics who claim that homeopathy is ‘pseudoscience’ and only non-scientists are interested in the subject.

In fact, scientists in highly respected universities, research institutions and hospitals around the world are carrying out research into homeopathy using the same research techniques as those used to investigate conventional medical treatments.

Homeopathy research is a relatively new field, but the number of articles published in peer reviewed journals has risen significantly over the past 40 years.

homeopathic studies

This lag behind conventional medicine is hardly surprising when one considers the lack of funding available e.g. in the UK less than 0.0085% of the medical research budget is spent on research into complementary and alternative medicines.1

 

International Research Conferences

Barcelona 2013 – Cutting Edge Research in Homeopathy

 

The inaugural HRI International Homeopathy Research Conference was held in Barcelona in June 2013. The programmed included presentations by 5 Professors and 40 doctors (PhDs or medics) from over 20 countries, covering clinical, experimental and veterinary research. Abstracts, filmed presentations and the conference report can be viewed here.

Rome 2015 – Cutting Edge Research in Homeopathy

 

The 2nd HRI International Research Conference, held in Rome on 5-7 June 2015, continued the ongoing theme of Cutting Edge Research. The programme included presentations on clinical, fundamental and basic research, by 6 Professors and 28 doctors (PhDs or medics) from 17 countries. The abstracts, filmed presentations and conference report can be viewed here.

 

So in what way is homeopathy ‘unscientific’?

Well-qualified scientists in respected institutions are now carrying out high quality basic research, clinical research and veterinary research in homeopathy, and are reporting positive results which are published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Therefore the only basis for the argument that it is ‘pseudoscience’ is that we do not know how homeopathy works.

Usually, when a phenomenon is observed which cannot be explained by what ‘science’ already knows, this triggers fresh scientific enquiry – it is not dismissed as ‘unscientific’ purely because it has yet to be understood.

References

 

Myths vs. Mythology

Homeopathy Explained - It works

Read More

Strychnos nux-vomica extract and its ultra-high dilution reduce voluntary ethanol intake in rats.

homeopathy for addictions science

Read More

Homeopathic Medical history is longer than other licenced medicines. Lyssin is a safer choice. Part B

Homeopathic Medical history than is longer than other licenced medicines. Lyssin is a safer choice. Part B

Homeopathy has been used before conventional medicines ever existed (in the 1700’s) while some of these ‘medicines’ are much more new as is the whole North American Medical Industry as we know it (1900’s) (See reference to Theodore Roosevelt https://www.griffinbenefits.com/employeebenefitsblog/history_of_healthcare. And Saskatchewan https://canadiandimension.com/articles/view/the-birth-of-medicare

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/keeping-canada-alive-1.3252807

 

charlie loves homeopathy too

You think Rabid Dog Saliva  (Lyssinum is one made with on drop of the saliva of a rabid dog preserved in alcohol medicine) is weird…

 

In our NEW predominant medical system there are so many things that are going on that are sooo much more weird (and way more NEW/experimental). Here are some fun (gross) examples:

 

1.     How about the mouse virus injected as part of chemotherapy that goes on everyday times millions of people. YES millions of people in hospitals are injected with an experimental version of chemotherapy that includes first injecting Rituximab which is a virus made in mice or rats…

http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads/how-is-rituximab-produced.43833/

 

2.     How about Belladonna and Opium (still used) http://www.businessinsider.com/yes-bayer-promoted-heroin-for-children-here-are-the-ads-that-prove-it-2011-11#bayers-heroina-for-irritation-and-bronchitis-1. Opium was a common cough suppressant not too long ago and is still used in many various forms in hospitals every day.

 

https://www.uwhealth.org/health/topic/multum/belladonna-and-opium-rectal/d03436a1.html

 

3.     ACE inhibitors (a common blood pressure medicine) such as captopril were based on an ingredient of the venom of the poisonous Brazilian Viper (Bothrops Jararaca) ehem do I hear snake oil coming to mind now? Yet these ‘discoveries’ … (remember which modalities are older and more well used with history of success)

 

https://www.pharmaceutical-journal.com/news-and-analysis/news/from-snake-venom-to-ace-inhibitor-the-discovery-and-rise-of-captopril/10884359.article

 

 

This list really could go on and on and on. I’ve read soooo much about this because the fact that homeopathy was developed in reaction to how harmfully archaic practices of bloodletting and so on were in the beginning days of homeopathy when everyone should’ve just learned from the best (homeopaths) instead of trying to degrade their practices with misinformation.

Think about it. Homeopathy's got a more successful history than other licenced medicines. Lyssin is a safer choice.

Think about it. Homeopathy’s got a more successful history than other licenced medicines. Lyssin is a safer choice.

The “Lyssin” that Anke Zimmerman (Vancouver Island’s licenced Naturopath using homeopathy to cure autism) was using is one of the thousands of homeopathic medicines ordered professionally from a homeopathic pharmacy in the U.K. that has existed long before any of our conventional licenced pharmacies. Lyssin and many other ‘unlicenced’ homeopathic medicines are used well within the legal health regulations of many other countries and have been in use for hundreds of years (over 200 years ago).

Compare that to anything made by GSK GlaksoSmithKline who have been in business since the year 2000 (18 years ago), Novartis who were established in 1996 (22 years), or Sanofi from France which was founded in 2004 (14 years ago) meaning they have approximately 10% of the experiential history that homeopathy has with working successfully to heal people’s health problems.

pharmacy foundation dates.png

What’s the first thing you ponder as you hire a professional that you’ll need to rely on? How long have they been doing this? Meanwhile Helios Homeopathic Pharmacy has a long history of working with the earliest medical association, the Royal Medical Society

royal medical society

(established 1737 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Medical_Society) to provide medicines for people (medical professionals/homeopaths) ever since then. Our regulatory bodies are too confused about historical medicines versus the medical/pharmaceutical industries and our corporate medical health system gets more attention/support as a result.

Please Health Canada look at the historical positive results that homeopaths and homeopathic medicines have and let homeopathy live for those who choose it.

Think about it. Homeopathy's got a more successful history than other licenced medicines. Lyssin is a safer choice. Part B

Homeopathy has been used before conventional medicines ever existed (in the 1700’s) while some of these ‘medicines’ are much more new as is the whole North American Medical Industry as we know it (1900’s) (See reference to Theodore Roosevelt https://www.griffinbenefits.com/employeebenefitsblog/history_of_healthcare. And Saskatchewan https://canadiandimension.com/articles/view/the-birth-of-medicare

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/keeping-canada-alive-1.3252807

 

 

i love charlie

You think Rabid Dog Saliva  (Lyssinum is one made with on drop of the saliva of a rabid dog preserved in alcohol medicine) is weird…

 

In our NEW predominant medical system there are so many things that are going on that are sooo much more weird (and way more NEW/experimental). Here are some fun (gross) examples:

 

1.     How about the mouse virus injected as part of chemotherapy that goes on everyday times millions of people. YES millions of people in hospitals are injected with an experimental version of chemotherapy that includes first injecting Rituximab which is a virus made in mice or rats…

http://forums.phoenixrising.me/index.php?threads/how-is-rituximab-produced.43833/

 

2.     How about Belladonna and Opium (still used) http://www.businessinsider.com/yes-bayer-promoted-heroin-for-children-here-are-the-ads-that-prove-it-2011-11#bayers-heroina-for-irritation-and-bronchitis-1. Opium was a common cough suppressant not too long ago and is still used in many various forms in hospitals every day.

 

https://www.uwhealth.org/health/topic/multum/belladonna-and-opium-rectal/d03436a1.html

 

3.     ACE inhibitors (a common blood pressure medicine) such as captopril were based on an ingredient of the venom of the poisonous Brazilian Viper (Bothrops Jararaca) ehem do I hear snake oil coming to mind now? Yet these ‘discoveries’ … (remember which modalities are older and more well used with history of success)

 

https://www.pharmaceutical-journal.com/news-and-analysis/news/from-snake-venom-to-ace-inhibitor-the-discovery-and-rise-of-captopril/10884359.article

 

 

This list really could go on and on and on. I’ve read soooo much about this because the fact that homeopathy was developed in reaction to how harmfully archaic practices of bloodletting and so on were in the beginning days of homeopathy when everyone should’ve just learned from the best (homeopaths) instead of trying to degrade their practices with misinformation.

 

 

“Scientists say homeopathy is impossible”

Science proves homeopathy

Read More

An integral approach to substance abuse.,Amodia DS, Cano C, Eliason MJ.

integral approach to substance abuse and addictions

Read More

Homeopathy on Vitality Link

Meet Elena Cecchetto, a homeopath based in Vancouver, BC.

Elena discovered homeopathy as a student in Toronto at her wit’s end with eczema.  She tried homeopathy as a last ditch effort, having experimented with countless treatments.

Elena says that’s how many people first discover the practice. “It was a last resort for me, like it is for many people. They’ve tried everything else.”

elena cecchetto treats many newborns, babies and toddlers along with pregnant and postpardum women

 

She explains that homeopaths get to know a client’s physical, emotional and behavioural profile and then recommend a remedy that is specifically matched to them. The remedies are made of natural ingredients and created in homeopathic pharmacies.

Elena got more than she bargained for from her first homeopathic experience. Her eczema began to go away when she took the remedy, and eventually disappeared altogether. But more than that, her experience of everyday life changed.

She says, “I just felt a level of inner joy and that the world was open to me. I wouldn’t even have been able to describe that I wanted to feel this way.”

That feeling is now what Elena aims to help her clients achieve. She gets feedback like, ‘I just feel lighter’ and ‘Things don’t bother me anymore’.

Elena sees many children in her East Vancouver practice and has special certification to treat autistic kids. She also immunizes children for a wide variety of illnesses.

She treats adult clients for many common maladies. A lactose intolerant client came in for a remedy and was able to eat ice cream and cheese the next day without any problem.

She’s helped clients navigate the spring and summer months allergy-free without taking any drugs.

She’s also treated people with addiction, depression and anxiety. In one case, a client unable to work for two weeks solid because of panic attacks was quickly back to the office after seeing Elena.

Homeopathy is generally not an overnight cure. Elena explains it takes time for the remedies to work. If you’ve been dealing with a health issue for a long time, or it occurs frequently, you should anticipate the healing process will take longer.

Elena says, “The homeopathic approach is that every person is different. There is no one cause of any condition. We look for the core thing that’s happening with this person and everything else connects to that. Homeopathy says everything is connected. We match one remedy to the whole person.”

Special Offer: Elena is offering 25% off the first intake appointment for the homeopathic immunization protocol. In this 1.5 hour appointment, Elena takes down the child’s entire background (including information about pregnancy and delivery) so she’s well positioned to help down the road as the child proceeds through life.

The regular price of the homeopathic immunization protocol is: $195.

Contact Elena at: (604) 568-4663 or info@accessnaturalhealing.com

For more information, please visit Elena’s VitalityLink profile. http://snip.ly/t9u44

--

Your Holistic Team, ~Access~

Web: http://www.AccessNaturalHealing.com/

Email: info@accessnaturalhealing.com

Phone: (604) 568-4663

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/edit?trk=hb_tab_pro_top/

“The information contained in this message is for educational purposes and constitutes a response to a private request for information only and does not constitute a solicitation for services and makes no claim or promise that any product or service that may cure any condition or ailment,”

Homeoprophylaxis

Japanese Encephalitis

American Journal of Infectious Diseases 6 (2): 24-28, 2010 ISSN 1553-6203 © 2010 Science Publications
Decreased Intensity of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection in Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Under Influence of Ultradiluted Belladonna Extract

1Bhaswati Bandyopadhyay, 2Satadal Das, 1Milan Sengupta, 3Chandan Saha, 4Kartick Chandra Das, 4Debabrata Sarkar and 5Chaturbhuj Nayak 1Department of Microbiology, Virology Unit, School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata-700073, India 2Department of Pathology and Microbiology, D.N. De H. Medical College, West Bengal University of Health Sciences, Kolkata-700046, India 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology, School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata-700073, India 4Drug Proving Research Centre, CCRH, Government of India, Kolkata-700 046, India 5Department of AYUSH, Ministry of Health, CCRH, Government of India, JLN Anudandhan Bhawan, 61-65 Intitutional Area, Janakpuri, New Delhi 110058

IMG_6927.JPG


Abstract: Problem statement: No specific antiviral therapy is currently available despite an emergence and resurgence of Japanese encephalitis in South-East Asian Countries. There are only few recent studies, which were aimed to treat Japanese encephalitis with newer drugs. There is thus a real need for study on antiviral agents that can reduce the toll of death and neurological sequelae resulting from infection with this virus. Approach: Optimum dilution of the JE virus was determined which could produce significant number of pocks on Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM). Then ultradiluted belladonna preparations were used to see their inhibitory action on JE virus infection in CAM. Results: Ultradiluted belladonna showed significantly decreased pock count in CAM in comparison to JE virus control. Conclusion: Ultradiluted belladonna could inhibit JE virus infection in CAM, which may be mediated through glycosidase inhibitory role of calystegines present in belladonna.
Key words: Japanese Encephalitis (JE), Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM), pock, belladonna

 

--

Your Holistic Team, ~Access~

Web: http://www.AccessNaturalHealing.com/

Email: info@accessnaturalhealing.com

Phone: (604) 568-4663

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/edit?trk=hb_tab_pro_top/

 

“The information contained in this message is for educational purposes and constitutes a response to a private request for information only and does not constitute a solicitation for services and makes no claim or promise that any product or service that may cure any condition or ailment,”

Cytotoxic effects of ultra-diluted remedies on breast cancer cells

homeopathy and breast cancer cells

Cytotoxic effects of ultra-diluted remedies on breast cancer cells

MOSHE FRENKEL1, BAL MUKUND MISHRA2, SUBRATA SEN2, PEIYING YANG1, ALISON PAWLUS1, LUIS VENCE3, AIMEE LEBLANC2, LORENZO COHEN1, PRATIP BANERJI4 and PRASANTA BANERJI4
1Integrative Medicine Program, 2Department of Molecular Pathology, 3Department of Melanoma Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA;
4P. Banerji Homeopathic Research Foundation, Kolkata, India Received May 28, 2009; Accepted July 23, 2009 DOI: 10.3892/ijo_00000512
Abstract. The use of ultra-diluted natural products in the management of disease and treatment of cancer has generated a lot of interest and controversy. We conducted an in vitro study to determine if products prescribed by a clinic in India have any effect on breast cancer cell lines. We studied four ultra-diluted remedies (Carcinosin, Phytolacca, Conium and Thuja) against two human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and a cell line derived from immortalized normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMLE). The remedies exerted preferential cytotoxic effects against the two breast cancer cell lines, causing cell cycle delay/arrest and apoptosis. These effects were accompanied by altered expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, including downregulation of phosphorylated Rb and upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p27, which were likely responsible for the cell cycle delay/arrest as well as induction of the apoptotic cascade that manifested in the activation of caspase 7 and cleavage of PARP in the treated cells. The findings demonstrate biological activity of these natural products when presented at ultra-diluted doses. Further in- depth studies with additional cell lines and animal models are warranted to explore the clinical applicability of these agents.